Thou is not mister or miss!

On this page, learn why thou does not want to be called mister so-and-so. Thou is not a ‘mister’ unless thou is a Navy Officer.

A retired admiral explained how the Navy uses the title mister.

  • When a man (or woman) joins the navy, he is referred to by his family name, such as “Henderson”, as in: “Henderson! Clean the deck!”
  • When he (or she) is promoted to an officer rank, then the title “mister” precedes his family name, as in: “Mister Henderson.”
  • When he (or she) is promoted to a top rank, such as admiral, then the specific title precedes his family name, as in “Admiral Henderson.”

To me, this helps show why people who are not in the navy, should not be using the title, lest someone presume they are in the Navy and subject to the Navy’s jurisdiction! Though everyone thinks it’s polite to call someone Mister Henderson, it’s actually impolite.

It’s polite to open the door for someone. Everyone knows that. But everyone would not naturally assume to refer to a neighbor as “Mister” so-and-so. That is likely part of the reason people are sent to the government’s schools where they learn at an early each to call their teachers Mister or Miss so-and-so. Yet another reason to not send thy property to the public (as in government) schools and instead unschool them.

From Anna Von Reitz: “If anyone calls you “Mr.” or “Mrs.” or “Miss” from now on, inform them that you are not a Warrant Officer in the Merchant Marines (that is, a Withholding Agent) and you will happily object if anyone presumes that you are.” – From Collapsing the Fraud — April 15th is a National Holiday

It is said that titles such as mister, resident, citizen, refer to actors or legal fictions, though I can’t explain this well. See the AT’s video below about avoiding the mistering trap. Start at the 4:18 mark.