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Sending postcards to people with perjury warning

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Guide at Educated in Law
Posts: 29
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(@adminu)
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Joined: 7 years ago

As noted on this website, I send postcards to people to show they live 'without United States'. I was thinking I could rile things up a bit by sending postcards to famous people and stating on the back:

"Receipt of this postcard proves thou lives without United States. Any statement to the contrary would be perjury."

Of course, the municipal corporations shrewdly use the word 'reside' not 'live' to pretend everyone is working. Nonetheless, the postcard could cause people to think. Also, the municipal corporations have been doing the same yet with the word 'reside'. We need to bring back the word 'live' or 'inhabit'. 

Thoughts?

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(@jacob-william)
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Joined: 3 months ago

This Man is more liable to put: "Receipt of this letter proves that the addressee lives without the United States. Any statement or writing purporting to claim otherwise would be perjury under the laws of the United States of America."

This Man has friends whom are currently incarcerated by the United States (Federal Corp.) Department of Prosecutions/Federal Bureau of Prisons. If this Man were to mail a letter to them - the *private counsels* of - the ALL CAPS NAME they are held under, certified with a return receipt, would then the FBOP be able to claim that they were mistaken in allowing receipt of the letter?  [The phrase *private counsel* refers to the Man's or Woman's given name; this Man will post a new thread explaining his grasp of the concept.]

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