Affidavit for passport, by Roger Sayles

See this affidavit for a passport, shown below, written by Roger Sayles, in which one asserts that one is a state citizen (e.g., Californian), not a U.S. Citizen (e.g., Puerto Rican). Since reading the six papers from NativeBornCitizen.com and the

Tweets from NativeBornCitizen

As part of my studies, I am transcribing (or copying/pasting) the tweets from the manager of NativeBornCitizen.com. This site has six essential (!) white papers that focus on: the difference between State citizens, such as Texans, and U.S. citizens, such

Regulation says “subject to its jurisdiction”, and clarifies the 14th Amendment

A tweet from @nothanksIRS clarifies the awkward wording of 14th amendment by citing a clearer regulation: It says a “citizen” is a person “born or naturalized in the United States” AND “subject to ITS jurisdiction”. So citizen = subject “U.S.” here

Treaty of Paris says each of the United States is sovereign and independent

The Treaty of Paris, which ended the American Revolutionary War, notes that each state, such as Vermont or North Carolina, is “sovereign and independent“. In contrast, United States of America is an association created to manage specific delegated duties assigned

Casino may win in federal court but this is a state issue

The mass-murder at the MGM Grand Casino prompted the casino to sue the survivors to prevent them from suing the casino. The casino claims that a federal law related to terrorist attacks makes the casino immune from lawsuits. Even if

When they say ‘you are…’, they are saying ‘you all are…”

The phrase or verb formation ‘You are’ is always plural and to make this point, just pretend to hear ‘You all are’. This came to mind when I overhead a Southerner saying, ‘C’mon y’all’. The phrase ‘y’all’ came about naturally

The informer writes about State, United States, Includes

I posted a page with an essay by the informer called ‘State, United States, Includes.’ It focuses on Title 26 of the U.S. Code, which deals with taxes. The study of taxes helped me see that ‘United States’, in many

Bakers vs. Butchers: Why did the Constitution protect a baker but not a butcher? Comparing Masterpiece Bakeshop to Slaughterhouse Cases

Why could a Colorado baker in 2018 Supreme Court case claim the Constitution protects him from a State government, but a Louisiana butcher in 1869 could not? The baker won his case likely by claiming to be a U.S. citizen (a

Bakery case reminds that Constitution restricts government but does not grant rights

The recent Supreme Court case involving the baker who refused to make a cake for a same-sex couple brings up a point about Constitutional rights. The First Amendment does not create or grant a right to free exercise of religion, it

Web version of The Matrix and the U.S. Constitution

Please see the new web version of The Matrix and the U.S. Constitution, written by unknown author, and originally found in PDF format. This is one of the ‘Top 10‘ documents recommended by Yusuf El. Here’s a portion: “Our America