“You” live “in” a state because “you” is a corp in a folder

I think Karl Lentz said one cannot stand “in” the parking lot because that means one is in the asphalt of the lot. One can instead say, “I am on the parking lot.” Related to this, I think the phrase to “live in the State of Ohio” is technically correct because State of Ohio (or STATE OF OHIO) is a corporation, and a corporation is a file folder holding the corporate charter and other corporate documents. (Note, State of Ohio differs from Ohio, which is the land state and part of the union of the states united.) The NAME, meaning FIRST LAST, is also a corporate entity (or possibly a trust or estate), not a living being. Therefore, the NAME, can be a file folder locatedĀ in State of Ohio.

This wording may not come up in court since the judge would instead say, “Are you a resident of the state of Ohio?” The judge gets jurisdiction when thou admits to being a resident, as in the role of a resident.

But if someone asks, “Do you live in the state of Ohio?”, the correct answer would always be ‘no.’

The other trap is the word “you”, since this, I believe, is a plural reference referring to the man (as the agent) and the corporation. The correct reference for a living man/woman is thou.

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